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Chlorine-solid-at-room-temperature, physical and chemical properties chlorine is a greenish yellow gas at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. it is two and a half times heavier than air. it becomes a liquid at −34 °c (−29 °f).. At room temperature chlorine is a gas, not a solid. chlorine is a solid below -100 degrees celsius, and a liquid between this temperature and -34 degrees celsius., at room temperature chlorine is a gas, not a solid. chlorine is a solid below -100 degrees celsius, and a liquid between this temperature and -34 degrees celsius.. Elements that are solids at room temperature include sodium, antimony, gold, silver and platinum. other such elements are arsenic, calcium, carbon, boron and tungsten. iron, lead, palladium and tin..., chlorine is a gas at room temperature due to its structure. chlorine is made up of two chlorine atoms, held together by covalent bonds, forming simple covalent molecules..

Explain why chlorine (cl2) is a gas at room temperature, but sodium chloride (nacl) is a solid at room temperature. the melting/boiling point of a substance determines what state of matter it takes at a certain temperature. in cl2 there are covalent bonds between the atoms forming simple molecules., since it combines directly with nearly every element, chlorine is never found free in nature. chlorine was first produced by carl wilhelm scheele, a swedish chemist, when he combined the mineral pyrolusite (mno 2) with hydrochloric acid (hcl) in 1774.although scheele thought the gas produced in his experiment contained oxygen, sir humphry davy proved in 1810 that it was actually a distinct ....

Chlorine | cl2 | cid 24526 - structure, chemical names, physical and chemical properties, classification, patents, literature, biological activities, safety/hazards ..., iodine is further down group 7 than chlorine. their group number only describes the number of electrons they have in their outer shell. as iodine has a higher atomic number than chlorine, it also has more electrons in its electron shells.